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On 15th May 2018 at 7.15pm at Dunblane Library, The Institute High Street, Dunblane FK15 OER

Tickets £5 - £3. Please call to book a place in advance 01786 823125.

James Robertson is a poet, editor and writer of fiction. He has published six novels, including the award-winning Joseph Knight and And the Land Lay Still, and The Testament of Gideon Mack which was long-listed for the Man Booker prize. He co-founded and is editor of the Itchy Coo imprint, which publishes books in Scots for young readers. His most recent novel, To Be Continued, involves a road-and rail trip to the Highlands by a man in the company of a talking toad. In 2017 he published Arrest This Moment, a biography of the late Michael Marra, the Dundee songwriter and musician.

See the Off the Page Book FestivalOff the Page Book Festival

Thursday, 19 April 2018 21:11

What next for the Braeport Centre?

Have you ever been involved in an event/activity at Dunblane’s Braeport Community Centre? How could the Centre serve you and other community members better?  

Please take a few minutes to complete the Online Survey by Tuesday 1st May

The Development Trust is currently working with a design team to look at the layout of the building based on anticipated future use. It is important that the changes made are in line with how residents want to use the space; so your opinions are extremely valuable.

More about what is happening at the Braeport Centre here

Article by Robert Fairnie from the Stirling Observer 18 April 2018

Two fruit trees have been stolen from a community orchard in Dunblane. Police are investigating after a Black Oliver cherry and a Sweet Prune damson were dug up and taken away by crooks last week. Those responsible would have had to cart the trees, complete with stake and protective netting, out of the park without being detected. A Clydeside apple tree was also pulled up and thrown over a nearby fence but has since been recovered and replanted. All three were introduced to the Laigh Hills by volunteers over a weekend in December as a community orchard, comprising 300 fruit trees in total, was created.

The £5000 project, which was led by the Friends of the Laigh Hills, was made possible thanks to the hard work of the community and funding from the Tesco Bags of Help grant scheme. Police visited the orchard after last week’s theft and they want anyone with information to come forward.

Alan Booth, of Dunblane Community Council, said: “That somebody would do this is disappointing for all those who gave up their time to help plant the trees. “We would urge users of the Laigh Hills to join Friends of the Laigh Hills group and notify us if they see anything unusual – be that things going wrong that need attention or new sightings of plants or animals that they want to share. “The good news is that the vast majority of the 300 trees we planted in December are now thriving.” The community orchard is thought to be one of the biggest of its kind in the area with a vast collection of trees planted to produce fruit in years to come. The trees came from a specialist fruit tree nursery near Perth and include Clydeside, Scot’s Bridget, Stirling Castle, Lemon Queen, Green Chisel, Gordon Castle and Black Oliver.

Mr Booth added: “The orchard will be a great asset, encouraging wildlife as well as producing fruit for all to enjoy. “It forms part of our plans to make the Laigh Hills a better place for people and wildlife.
“We are keen to add names to the Friends of the Laigh Hills group to take this forward, so anyone who is interested in getting involved, or just telling someone if they see something going wrong, please get in touch withy This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..” Members of the group are also hoping to embark on a project to plant wildflowers in the area in coming weeks too. Anyone with information on the fruit tree theft is encouraged to contact police on 101.

A further round of the Ideas Innovation Improvement Fund has opened, with a deadline of 25 May 2018.

Applications are welcomed from voluntary and community groups, charities and social enterprises delivering projects which aim for people living full and positive lives within supportive communities.

Applications for up to £2000 for an individual organisation, or £6000 for organisations applying in partnership, will be considered.

Full details, and application form, on the attached document.

There are six defibrillators in Dunblane that we are aware of. They are located

  • The Dunblane Centre on the Perth Road
  • The Westlands Hotel in the Doune Road
  • St Blane's Church Hall in the High Street
  • Northend Garage in Ramoyle
  • The Coop in the High Street
  • The Braeport Centre in Braeport

Do you know of any others? If so, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Kerse Road Bridge Update - Urgent
 
We have been advised work is progressing well with the replacing of the New Rail Bridge to the extent they are bringing the full closure date forward by 1 week.  The planned full closure for Kerse Road Bridge is being brought forward by one week. This  commenced at 6.00 am on the morning of Monday 16 April 2018. Community Engagement Team 01786 233076

Read Network Rail's monthly update for March 2018

22 years ago messages of kindness and support flowed into Dunblane from all over the world.

For the next few days there is Book of Condolence for people to sign in Dunblane's 'Another Tilly Tearoom'

For anybody who would like to send a message to the families affected by the shooting at the school in Parkland, Florida. #neveragain#dunblanestandswithparkland#

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From the Stirling Observer 20 March 2018

A dog was hit and  killed by a train in Dunblane at the weekend prompting fresh calls for repairs to be made to a fence at the railway line.  Representatives from Dunblane Community Council contacted Network Rail to ask that they sort the structure which separates the Laighhills public park from the train tracks. The area is popular with dog walkers and concern is growing that the gaps appearing between the bottom of the fence and the ground are allowing pets access to the railway line. A seven-year-old Collie was killed after straying on to the train tracks during a walk with its owner in the park earlier this month. The dog’s distressed owner, who asked not to be named, told the Stirling Observer the pet spotted some rabbits on the other side of the fence and managed to get through.  She said: “It was getting dark and he just went down the side of the hill to chase the rabbits I think. The fence is very close to the train tracks. “We were running around looking for him but couldn’t find him anywhere. We didn’t know where he had gone and it was getting darker and darker. ”The family became aware that something bad had happened when representatives from Network Rail arrived on the scene to say that a dog had been hit by a passing train. After finding the dog on the tracks he was taken home by his heartbroken family. His owner added: “There are a lot of people who take their dogs to the park which should be a safe area for pets .“I’ve spoken to some neighbours and they are also concerned about it. Dogs can scramble under some parts of the fence and larger breeds can jump over over other sections .”

Terence O’Byrne, chair of Dunblane Community Council, believes it’s lucky more dogs have not been killed on the tracks. He said: “The community council has reported this issue with the fence to Network Rail. “We expect them to make sure that the bottom of the fence meets the ground with no gaps and expect this repair to be done as soon as possible. We will keep a close eye on their response. “This fence is in a public park and as such must be more than simply ‘stock proof’. Dogs have been killed on the rail line for many long years. It is a matter of luck that more dogs have not been killed.”

A Network Rail spokesperson said: “Our maintenance engineers will inspect the lineside fencing in the area and make any necessary repairs. “Our fencing is primarily designed to help people stay off of the railway by showing the boundary between our infrastructure and other land. We would advise dog owners to always keep pets on a leash when in close proximity to the railway as fencing may not always prevent smaller animals reaching the line.”

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